Tony Clark

Most people think running a country inn is a reality born out of a long-held romantic fantasy-a vision of a way of life. This is Tony Clark’s story based on that notion. In 1963 he was a na1ve nineteen year-old Welshman with a dream of traveling the world-or at least the United States. He fantasized about life America with no real clue as to what he would do, where he would go or how he would survive.

In September 1964, he landed at Logan Airport in Boston, enroute to a job teaching French and coaching soccer at the Eaglebrook School in Deerfield, Massachusetts. Tony settled into life at Eaglebrook and became very friendly with the art teacher, Martha and her husband, Lou Couvert. Lou and Tony shared a love for nature, the mountains and specifically, New England. The following summer, Lou was killed in a tragic rock climbing accident, and as a result, Tony became even closer to Martha and her young son, Tim. Friendship led to romance, which led to Vermont, which led to marriage. They married in 1968 and had a. celebration at the property Martha had just purchased-a place called Blueberry Hill Farm, previously owned by the Masterton family, in the remote town of Goshen, Vermont. They moved into the charming 1813 farmhouse situated in the heart of the Green National Forest hoping to return to nature and be self-sufficient. Martha and Tony had a son, Christopher.

In December 1971, they hung out the Blueberry Hill Inn shingle and were open for business. The business grew, with Tony as the promoter in charge of marketing the inn and developing the cross-country ski center. Martha focused on the inn utilizing her artistic and culinary skills, and together they began to the develop Blueberry Hill as an ideal mountain retreat where one could ski and relax in the atmosphere of a restored 1813 farmhouse, and enjoy fine country cuisine. Today, Blueberry Hill Inn is reputed to be one of the nation’s premier country inns and cross-country touring centers.

All through the years as an innkeeper, Tony has been supportive of his town and its people; inviting Goshen residents to ski on the cross-countryski trails, offering the children lessons and supporting local skiers who wanted to compete. Tony has also been active in town affairs. He and his second wife, Shari Brown, were part of forming the first recycling committee. He continues to supply plastic bags used in sorting and donating all returnable bottles and cans collected at the. inn to help support the recycling center. Tony even supplied the funds for insulating the building. Tony was instrumental in founding the Moosalamoo foundation, which helps preserve the wilderness area in Goshen. He has brought business to our area, putting Goshen on the map with a positive image.